WRWF Suggested Reading

An area where you will find book suggestions that pertain to programs we have funded and nonprofits we have supported.

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Recommended Reading

To celebrate Idaho’s Hunger Awareness Month, The Hunger Coalition and the Local Food Alliance are hosting a free movie screening of “Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story.” Here are “Recommended Readings” from our members.

The Hungry Brain

The Hungry Brain: Nutrition/Cognition Connection –
by Susan Augustine.
“Nutrition is often the missing clue to the mystery of why children can’t learn.” Our support of the Hunger Coalition’s Healthy Bites program will help to address this problem in our community.  This book expands the understanding of what happens to the brain when it is not properly nourished.

A Place at the Table

A Place at the Table: The Crisis of 49 Million Hungry Americans and How to Solve It –
by Participant Media (Author), Peter Pringle (Editor)
Hunger and food insecurity pose a deep threat to our nation. A Place at the Table shows they can be solved once and for all, if the American public decides—as they have in the past—that making healthy food available, and affordable, is in the best interest of us all.

Closing the Food Gap

Closing the Food Gap: Resetting the Table in the Land of Plenty –
by Mark Winne
Winne tells the story of how America’s food gap has widened since the 1960s, when domestic poverty was “rediscovered,” and how communities have responded with a slew of strategies and methods to narrow the gap, including community gardens, food banks, and farmers’ markets. The story, however, is not only about hunger in the land of plenty and the organized efforts to reduce it; it is also about doing that work against a backdrop of ever-growing American food affluence and gastronomical expectations.

End 68 Hours of Hunger

Recommended Reading / April-May 2015

The scope of services offered by the Senior Connection touches so many lives in our Valley.  WRWF has supported several of their programs over the last ten years, and they are a final grantee for 2015.

The Connection newsletter is available for pick up in the lobby of St. Luke’s.  The April edition has the first in a four part series titled “Caregivers of Elderly Parents.” You may also access this series online at:outreach@blainecountyseniors.org  Nicole Detra, the Outreach Coordinator for the Senior Connection, is the author.

Several books that are beneficial to those caring for aging parents are:

End 68 Hours of Hunger: Ending Childhood Hunger in America, One School at a Time
by Claire V Bloom  This 5 star rated book takes a stance that mirrors our own Hunger Coalition in the valley.

End 68 Hours of Hunger is a private, not-for-profit effort to end childhood hunger in America, one school at a time by confronting the 68 hours of hunger some children experience between the free lunch they get in school on Friday and the free breakfast they get in school on Monday. Through local programs that work with local schools, End 68 Hours of Hunger provides bags of food to these children to take home on the weekend.

Recommended Reading

The scope of services offered by the Senior Connection touches so many lives in our Valley.  WRWF has supported several of their programs over the last ten years, and they are a final grantee for 2015.

The Connection newsletter is available for pick up in the lobby of St. Luke’s.  The April edition has the first in a four part series titled “Caregivers of Elderly Parents.” You may also access this series online at:outreach@blainecountyseniors.org  Nicole Detra, the Outreach Coordinator for the Senior Connection, is the author.

Several books that are beneficial to those caring for aging parents are:

A Bittersweet Season

A Bittersweet Season by Jane Gross – Jane Gross begins her personal story with a startling fact.  “There have never been so many Americans over the age of eighty five.  And, never have there been so many Americans in late middle age responsible for their parents’ health and well-being.”

  • She discusses the importance of family involvement, the health care system, public health issues, relying on a geriatrician to get the big picture, and end of life issues decisions.

The 36-Hour Day

The 36-Hour Day by Nancy Mace and Dr. Peter Rabins – This is a comprehensive guide for families facing the extraordinary challenges of caring for a family member or friend with Alzheimer’s, dementia, and memory loss.

Being Mortal

Being Mortal by Atul Gawande – Dr. Gawande is searching for ideas to reinvent elder care by supporting quality of life. Most doctors treat disease and figure the rest will take care of itself.  Their attitude is if the patient is heading for a nursing home, then so be it.  Loss of freedom and independence is just the way it is. But Dr Gawande has found others who are determined to help the elderly live a life with meaning and joy and not wither in a strange bed beside someone they don’t know.  This book is full of fresh ideas and hope–not easily achieved but worth the struggle to maintain a good and fulfilling life.

Can’t We Talk About Something More PLEASANT?

Can’t We Talk About Something More PLEASANT?  by Roz Chast – This is a poignant, heartbreaking, but hysterically funny memoir with wonderful illustrations  that make one laugh out loud.  Who has not heard a story about a Mom and Dad behaving like Archie and Edith Bunker when the time seems right to have a serious discussion about health, aging, wills, and end-of-life directives?  And the paranoia of some parents if they think you are intruding into their lives?
This book is an excellent start on the journey of reading about caring for aging family members.

Recommended Reading

Morley Golden and Louise Stumph of WOW, one of our funded agencies, want Blaine County students to take responsibility for their community by demonstrating the power of generosity and compassion.

Raising Charitable Children

Raising Charitable Children by Carol Weisman.  A good starter book for younger children on volunteering and giving.

The Kid’s Guide to Service Projects

The Kid’s Guide to Service Projects:  500 Service Ideas for Young People Who Want to Make a Difference by Barbara Lewis

The Opposite of Spoiled

The Opposite of Spoiled:  Raising Kids Who Are Grounded, Generous and Smart About Money by Ron Lieberman.  Two ideas are that empathy and social justice are not prideful activities and that young people should feel humble about privilege.

Recommended Reading

Jana Fitzpatrick, a Reading Specialist at Hemingway Elementary, has these recommendations for teaching your child to read. She says, paraphrased, “Screen-time can wait, learning to read cannot. To help prepare your child to read, keep conversing with the child 24/7. Sing songs, say nursery rhymes, sing the alphabet, over and over. Use words describing the child’s natural surroundings…“Label the Kitchen” is a fun activity – take post-it notes and label specifics in that room. Read to your child, go to the library.”

Her favorite all time books are:

Raising Lifelong Learners

Raising Lifelong Learners by Lucy Calkins

Good Night Moon

Good Night Moon for babies by Margaret Wise Brown and Clement Hurd

I Am Reading

I Am Reading by Cathy Collins and Matt Glover

A Path Appears

A Path Appears by Nicholas Kristoff and Sheryl Wudon

Recommended Reading

Ryan Redman, the Executive Director of Flourish, recommends:

Happiness

Happiness by Mattieu Ricard. Ryan expresses his unshakable belief in the work done by Flourish, and says “it Is imperative that we consider the consequences of our way of being in the world. If we can shift our focus to the development of mental peace, inner contentment, and universal compassion, it is possible for humanity to co-create a more sustainable future.”

Leaves Falling Gently

Leaves Falling Gently by Susan Bauer WU. Ryan expresses his unshakable belief in the work done by Flourish, and says “it Is imperative that we consider the consequences of our way of being in the world. If we can shift our focus to the development of mental peace, inner contentment, and universal compassion, it is possible for humanity to co-create a more sustainable future.”

Recommended Reading

Swiftsure_logo

Swiftsure Therapeutic Equestrian Center serves 116 riders weekly offering seven different programs.  WRWCF funded two programs in 2014– $25,000 for the Ranch Hand Summer Program, and $8,000 for a joint venture between Swiftsure and The Senior Connection. Among the 116 horseback riders served each week there are 15 to 20 veterans.

Swiftsure Ranch Hand Summer Program Participants

This is what Hugh Blue, a longtime volunteer at Swiftsure says about the benefits of the riding programs:

“The walking motion of the horse closely resembles the human walking gait. Horses used in equine assisted-activities and therapy (EAAT) benefit their riders through activation of postural control, balance, and motor and sensory systems that cannot be recreated in normal therapy settings. Other benefits that we see are improved sequencing and planning skills, added trust and patience, improved impulse control, and empathy. Also, a renewed level of kindness, respect and self-confidence.”

Recommended Reading:

How to Think Like a Horse

How to Think Like a Horse by Cherry Hill

Zen Mind Zen Horse

Zen Mind Zen Horse by Allan Hamilton

‘Riding My Way Back’

Google this outstanding documentary:

‘Riding My Way Back’ The story of an Iraq and Afghanistan vet on the verge of suicide who is guided back to the world by a horse named Fred.

Recommended Reading

nami-wood-river-valley-logo

We at WRWCF have granted funds toward the training programs of our local NAMI Foundation (National Association of Mental Illness). In 2015 our funding totaled $18,500.

Thus, we have chosen as the recommended readings for the months of October and November courageous autobiographies written by those suffering from mental illness or whose families may have incurred mental illness. These books are available to bring us to a greater understanding of those who are inflicted with this disease. Our recommendations are as follows:

The Center Cannot Hold

The Center Cannot Hold by Elyn Saks

Darkness Visible

Darkness Visible by William Styron

Brain on Fire

Brain on Fire by Susannah Cahalan

Just Like Someone With Mental Illness Only More So

Just Like Someone With Mental Illness Only More So by Dr. Mark Vonnegut

Crazy: A Father’s Search Through America’s Mental Health Madness

Crazy: A Father’s Search Through America’s Mental Health Madness by Pete Earley

Recommended Reading

A few ‘best of show ‘of western writers (personal opinion disclosed!!)

Wallace Stegner
Ivan Doig
Gretel Ehrlich
Thomas McGuane
Jim Harrison, Molly Glass‐tough women we cannot even imagine
Craig Lesley, James Galvin, Brady Udall‐‐‐gripping!
Judy Blunt‐‐don’t marry a cowboy
Mary Clearman Blew

The Big Burn

The Big Burn: Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire That Saved America by Timothy Egan

Cadillac Desert

Cadillac Desert: The American West and its Disappearing Water by Marc Reisner.  This book describes Western development and how it happened despite the lack of water.

Beyond the Hundreth Meridian

Beyond the Hundreth Meridian: John Wesley Powell and the Second Opening of the West by Wallace Stegner.  This is a far‐reaching study of Powell’s ideas reflecting his understanding of the western environment and his unshakable belief in common humanity and balanced agreements among citizens and politicians.

Desert Solitaire

Desert Solitaire by Edward Abbey:  This outspoken book is a delight, definitely written with opinion!  It will make you laugh. I quote from the book, ‘The refrigerator is a useful machine.  Not indispensable but useful, without which the highball or the Cuba libre would be a poor thing indeed.’ His fears of careless oversight of our parks and forests are as real today as they when he wrote this book in 1968.

Movie - Chinatown

A great movie to re‐watch is Chinatown with our hero Jack Nicholson sustaining a slit nose and chasing very bad folks who unlocked water for Los Angeles‐‐‐not in a good way.

Recommended Reading

Ryan Redman, the Executive Director of Flourish ,expresses his unshakable belief in the work done by Flourish, and says “it Is imperative that we consider the consequences of our way of being in the world. If we can shift our focus to the development of mental peace, inner contentment, and universal compassion, it is possible for humanity to co-create a more sustainable future.”

Ryan recommends:

Happiness

Happiness by Mattieu Ricard

Leaves Falling Gently

Leaves Falling Gently by Susan Bauer WU